Program for the Fall 2009 Multidisciplinary Research Day


DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY

Analytical Papers and Analyses

Nelson, Peter; Montgomery, Lisa. CALCIUM CONCENTRATIONS USING ATOMIC ABSORBTION ON LOESS HILL AND GLACIAL SOILS.
The Calcium concentrations studies in the Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge consist of loess hill soils, glacial till plain soils and adjacent areas which are important in determining the diversity of local soil types. We propose to study the concentration of calcium along a concentration gradient; in each area to determine the elemental content of the soil. This data will provide us with a comparison of Calcium and eventually other elements present in the soil of this unique landscape. We will be using the Atomic Absorption to determine concentrations of calcium in the soil using analysis provided by Varian Techron, manufacturer of the Atomic Absorption equipment. This will be a springboard protocol to look at other key elements in the soil including potassium, sodium, copper and magnesium. We expect typical measurements of these elements to be as follows: Ca 150ug/g, Na 20ug/g, K 0.8% and Mg 0.36%.
Faculty Sponsor: HARTMAN, KURT

Empirical Projects

Arn, Lauren; Babcock, Billy; Dugger, Tara; Jeffries, Michael; Montgomery, Lisa; Sullivan, Amanda; Hartman, Kurt. ANALYSIS OF SYMPHORICARPOS ORBICULATUS IN SUN VERSUS SHADE.
The goal of this project was to look at growth plasticity in sun versus shade environments of coralberry shrubs. These plants were sampled in the loess hills bordering the Missouri River at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. Physical characteristics of these plants were measured and interpreted. The most significant differences between the sunlit and shaded leaves were found to be the disease spots and leaf area. The shaded leaves were higher in both of these areas. The leaf mass, number of major veins, and number of seeds per fruit were not significantly different when sunlit and shaded plants were compared.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. KURT HARTMAN
Asher, Kirby; Kerner, Zack; Limle, Ben; Lynch, Spencer; Portman, Trevor. CLIMATE DATA ANALYSIS AT SQUAW CREEK NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE.
Our goal was to investigate and analyze climate data collected by electronic weather stations, one of which was placed in a dense forested area, while the other was placed in a virgin prairie in a loess hill ecosystem at Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge. This is a unique habitat in that it is a relatively intact locale with little human disturbance of the vegetation and soil, and the knowledge gained by analyzing the climatic differences in this area could potentially influence habitat management implications, and more potential research ideas.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. KURT HARTMAN
Asher, Kirby. FISH POPULATION & HABITAT STUDY USING AN ELECTRO-FISHING & WISE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT PRACTICE.
I was awarded a competitive Conservation Internship through Missouri Department of Conservation for the summer of 2009. I worked with the fisheries management biologists at Pony Express Conservation Area in Osborn, Missouri. I, and the two fisheries biologists, Matt Engel and Jerry Wiechman, surveyed fish populations and helped land owners apply wise property management practices. The Wildlife Conservation and Management Degree Program at Missouri Western State University requires majors to experience a professional Applied Learning Internship as part of the degree program. I was fortunate to be able to count this MDC Professional Internship toward my degree internship requirement.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. CARY CHEVALIER
Ausberger, Teresa; Seek, Lara; Sallee, Abby; Jamie Riley; Knadler, Judy. BIO 455 MINIPROJECTS: ENTOMOLOGICAL HUZZAH STREAM AQUATIC SAMPLES.
We conducted a one day study of aquatic invertebrates in the Huzzah Stream at Reis Biological Station in Steelville, MO. Samples were taken using kicknets and a Hess sampler in both riffle and run current types. We took a total of three kicknets and three Hess samples from each stream habitat giving us twelve different samples. Specimens were compared to a voucher series and entered to a SPSS dataset and analyses are in progress.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. DAVID ASHLEY
Ausberger, Teresa; Sheehan, Kristen; Zirkle, Colton; Mills, Mark. POPULATION ECOLOGY OF TURTLES ON MISSOURI WESTERN STATE UNIVERSITY\\\'S CAMPUS.
We have initiated a long-term study of the population ecology of turtles in nine ponds on the campus of Missouri Western State University as part of MWSU’s Summer Research Institute. To date, we have marked 41 turtles representing four species. Of these species, 20 marked turtles have been recaptured. The ponds differ in their size, depth, temperature, composition of bottom sediments, and amount and make-up of vegetation in and surrounding the ponds. Among the measured pond characteristics, only the relative amount of trees surrounding the pond and water temperature played significant roles in predicting turtle species composition and abundance.
Faculty Sponsor: MARK MILLS
Ausberger, Teresa; Sallee, Abby; Levy, Sandy; Deveau, Nicole; Hartman, Dr. Kurt. A CASE STUDY IN RESOURCE ALLOCATION OF ACROSS A LIGHT-MOISTURE GRADIENT.
We studied the growth plasticity of giant sunflower (Helianthus annus) plants, which were grown in a light-moisture gradient. Plants were grown in the sun and shade in an urban environment in Saint Joseph, Missouri from the months of May to August. The climate and weather conditions in this area vary from day to day and month to month. Our goal was to measure the differences between the effects of this resource gradient on the overall growth and relative allocation to vegetative and reproductive plant parts. From this quantitative study, tables and figures were generated which suggest that a significant difference (P<0.05) exists between aboveground and belowground biomass within the two locations (sun and shade). A significant difference is also present within the two locations for total stem biomass (wet and dry). These results indicate that this is largely a sun-requiring plant, especially for sexual reproduction and that plasticity is demonstrated across this light-moisture gradient beneath tree canopies. There have been other studies that support the idea that plants need light to successfully grow [Mortimer 1992]. This idea supports the information that was collected and analyzed from this resource gradient, and supports the idea that although plants will grow in the shade, the overall reproductive and vegetative growth is greater in a light gradient.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. KURT HARTMAN
Cook, Richard, Anderson, Audrey, Redman, Miles, Chevalier, Cary. SUMMER HABITAT SELECTION BY BOBWHITE QUAIL (COLINUS VIRGINIANUS) ON PRIVATE LANDS..
Northern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) are the dominant native quail in the prairie ecosystem in North America, and the premier upland game bird in North America. Unfortunately, over the last decade or so, quail populations in the Midwest, including Missouri have shown a steady decline, largely due to widespread habitat destruction by way of habitat conversion for urban development and agriculture practices. In 2003 Missouri Department of Conservation instituted a strategic plan for recovery of northern bobwhite quail in Missouri. The purpose of this study is to determine quail response to the habitat restoration and management practices on a farm actively involved in quail habitat restoration and management. This project is part of an on-going study so in many ways, our data are preliminary. 8 quail were fitted with radio transmitter collars and monitored at least once/week. Our data currently suggests that the quail are responding well to the management practices being applied on this farm.
Faculty Sponsor: CARY D. CHEVALIER
Good, Ryan, Daggett, Melissa A. F.. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING AND TOXICOLOGICAL POTENTIAL OF TRICLOSAN ON DEVELOPING ZEBRAFISH..
Triclosan is a widely used chlorinated phenolic antimicrobial used in a variety of soaps, toothpastes, cosmetics, fabrics, and plastics and is structurally similar to bisphenol A and dioxin. Preliminary results indicate multiple effects of triclosan (200 ng/ml) on developing zebrafish embryos, including changes in heart rate and eye diameter. We hypothesize that the change in heart rate may be the result of triclosan’s endocrine disrupting effect on the expression of receptors that control heart rate. Changes in the expression of several genes known to be regulated thyroid hormone will be analyzed using by RT-PCR and presented.
Faculty Sponsor: MELISSA A. F. DAGGETT
Limle, Ben. SUMMER INTERNSHIP WITH THE ARIZONA GAME AND FISH DEPARTMENT.
I was fortunate to be awarded an AGFD student internship position, and to be able to adapt this applied learning experience to my Wildlife Conservation and Management Degree Internship requirement. My job responsibilities involved 3 primary tasks: 1) desert bighorn sheep radio telemetry(both ground and aerial), 2) water catchment maintenance and monitoring using trail cameras, and 3) to trap and band mourning doves. I also participated in several other projects, such as prairie dog den dusting with insecticides to prevent disease spread for the reintroduction of black footed ferrets, various animal surveys, water patrol ride alongs, and many other projects.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. CARY CHEVALIER
Lutz, Clay; Portman, Trevor; Lynch, Spencer; Benson, Brice; Brady, Cindy. BIO 455 MINI-PROJECT: BLACKLIGHT SAMPLING OF OZARK TERRESTRIAL HABITATS.
Our group evaluated insect diversity in Ozark habitats located at the Reis Biological Station near Steelville,Mo. We sampled three terrestrial habitats, using a black light bucket trap. We collected 18 samples in a 2 day span(10-3-09 to 10-4-09). On 10-3-09 we collected samples from the Riparian Corridor 1, 2, and 3. Then collected samples from the Prairie 1, 2, and 3. We collected samples from the Woodland 1, 2, and 3. On 10-4-09 we collected the same three terrestrial samples. The Riparian Corridor, the Prairie, the Woodland 1, 2, and 3. We are currently analyzing our data.
Faculty Sponsor: ASHLEY
Nelson, Peter; Bibb, Kristin, Clark, Carol; Stehly, Matt. BIO 455 MINI-PROJECTS: MALAISE TRAPPING IN TERRESTRIAL HABITATS.
Over a two day period, Malaise traps were set out in two different habitats. The first habitat consisted of open field in which three traps were placed overnight to collect various insects. The next habitat, the wooded area, consisted of a mixture of shrubs, immature trees, and very few mature trees. Collection times for the samples were in the early morning at dawn and half an hour before dusk. The terrestrial samplings were then analyzed to distinguish the diversity of insects. After carefully sorting the insects and correctly identifying each species, the data was then processed by a voucher series. The data from the voucher series was then recorded and entered into Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and Quantan to determine various indices such as Shannon Weaver for population densities. These statistical aides helped to determine the different species that occurred in the two different types of habitats.
Faculty Sponsor: DAVID, ASHLEY
Vernon, Will Sczcpanik, Bryce Davis, Clif Sun, Siya Schnoor, Ashley. THE ROLLING CLONES: CAN'T GET NO SATISFACTION.
Our team research goal was to advance the developing field of bacterial computing by harnessing the inherent biological properties of E. coli to tackle computationally challenging mathematical problems from a class known as NP-complete. Our system is designed to use frameshift suppressor tRNAs as inputs that can be processed by frameshift suppressor leaders (FSLs) that enable the translation of reporter constructs only when an appropriate combination of inputs is present. We constructed FSLs as logical clauses in reporter genes encoding fluorescent proteins. Once logical clauses are satisfied the bacterial cells will fluoresce indicating that the problem is satisfied.
Faculty Sponsor: TODD ECKDAHL, JEFF POET
Vernon, Will Szczepanik, Bryce Davis, Clif Sun, Siya Schnoor, Ashely Sawyer, Eric. THE ROLLING CLONES: I CAN'T GET NO SATISFACTION.
Our team research goal was to advance the developing field of bacterial computing by harnessing the inherent biological properties of E. coli to tackle computationally challenging mathematical problems from a class known as NP-complete. Our system is designed to use frameshift suppressor tRNAs as inputs that can be processed by frameshift suppressor leaders (FSLs) that enable the translation of reporter constructs only when an appropriate combination of inputs is present. We constructed FSLs as logical clauses in reporter genes encoding fluorescent proteins. Once logical clauses are satisfied the bacterial cells will fluoresce indicating that the problem is satisfied.
Faculty Sponsor: TODD ECKDAHL, JEFF POET
Xiang, Feng; Daggett, Melissa A. F.. BIOMONITORING OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (PAHS) EXPOSURE IN DEVELOPING ZEBRAFISH .
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are pollutants found in the environment due largely to the burning of fossil fuels. PAHs have been shown to cause synergistic developmental toxicity in fish embryos including pericardial edema and craniofacial malformations. Previous studies have indicated that in the zebrafish model, this toxicity includes participation of the Phase I enzyme cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A), the fish homolog of the mammalian CYP1A1 and 1A2. The goal of this project was to begin initial characterization of the zebrafish CYP1A gene to use as a biomonitoring tool in detecting potential PAH contamination in area streams and aquatic environments.
Faculty Sponsor: DAGGETT
Zeigler, Ashleigh; Jennings, Jesse; Levy, Sandra; Mcintosh, Mary. BIO455 MINI-PROJECTS: USING BLACKLIGHT TRAPPING TO SAMPLE INSECT DIVERSITY ON MWSU CAMPUS.
We sampled the insect diversity and richness in the terrestrial habitats on Missouri Western State University campus using blacklight sampling. Our team set up three blacklight traps in five different microhabitats on campus: the forensic field area, the forensic forest area, the forensic pond area, the Otoe Creek bottom, and the Otoe Creek upland. We set the traps out at dusk and checked them each morning for two mornings, creating a two trap night study. After the samples were collected we created a voucher series to demonstrate the various species collected on campus. QUANTAN was used to calculate the Shannon-Weiner Diversity index and SPSS statistical software was used for statistical analysis.
Faculty Sponsor: ASHLEY
Zeigler, Ashley , Seek, Lara , Jennings, Jesse , Blakley, Brian , Gilbert, Brian , Hartman, Kurt. AN INVENTORY OF PATHOGENS FOUND ON THE NORTHERN PIN OAK, QUERCUS PALUSTRIS, IN THIS REGION..
The northern pin oak (Quercus palustrus) is native to north central and eastern North America and is a common tree planted throughout Northwestern Missouri. Although the pin oak is a highly popular tree species, it struggles in success in this particular section of the state. The pin oak is possibly susceptible to a variety of pathogens due to our silt type, circumneutral soil. For this project, we visited the Biology Study Area of Missouri Western State University and inventoried the pathogens found on pin oaks. We photo-documented the pathogens in the field and verified pathogen identity using compound and dissecting microscopy. A variety of pathogens caused by insects and fungi were found including anthracnose, galls, and chlorosis. No bacterial infections were found, although we did not correlate soil conditions to pathogens, soil likely has large effects on disease susceptibility and virulence. (Messenger 1984) Follow-up studies will be conducted to address these correlations.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. KURT HARTMAN
Zhu,Xiao;Cool,Robert. DESIGNING AND CONSTRUCTING A FRAMESHIFT SUPPRESSOR LOGIC TOOLKIT .
We designed and constructed logic gates for use in bacterial computers that use five-base frameshift suppressor tRNAs. The four basic logic gates AND, NAND, OR, and NOR comprise a toolkit that promises to be of general use in synthetic biology. In a proof-of-concept experiment, we used the logic gates to construct bacterial computers that carry out hash functions.
Faculty Sponsor: TODD ECKDAHL, JEFF POET

Historical Papers

Lynch, Spencer. CANADIAN GOOSE DEPREDATION IN THE GLACIAL LAKES AREA OF SOUTH DAKOTA.
This past summer I was lucky enough to land an internship with the South Dakota Game and Fish Department. My position was a Wildlife Technician and dealt mainly with Canadian Goose Depredation as well as pheasant depredation. This poster will focus on the Canadian Goose and examine tactics such as lethal and non-lethal hazing, propane cannons, and electric fencing as tools for minimizing crop damage.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. CHEVALIER
Zeigler, Ashleigh. APPLIED LEARNING AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPEMENT: MY INTERNSHIP .
Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) has a very competitive professional development student internship program. The Wildlife Conservation and Management Degree Program at Missouri Western State University (MWSU) requires that majors complete an Applied Learning professional development internship as part of the degree requirements. The opportunity for a student to experience both of these programs is an excellent example of the educational and training partnerships that can be developed between a university and a natural resource agency. I was fortunate to be awarded an MDC professional development internship position with Protection Division, and to be able to adapt this applied learning experience to my Wildlife Conservation and Management Degree Internship requirement. This internship provided me hands-on experience in how a natural resource agency meets the special challenges of natural resource law enforcement and education.
Faculty Sponsor: CHEVALIER

URSI Project

Pasch, Erica. EFFECTS OF TRICLOSAN ON INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO EXPERIMENTAL COLITIS.
Evidence suggests that alterations in the intestinal microbiota may play a role in the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease. Triclosan, an antibacterial agent found in consumer products, is detectable in plasma and urine from sample human populations. The current study determined whether low doses of triclosan, mimicking environmental exposure, alter the intestinal microbiota and susceptibility to experimental colitis. Mice were given triclosan in the drinking water (10g/ml) for 6 days, followed by induction of colitis by 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Fecal bacteria were cultured for quantification of lactobacilli and coliforms. Fecal DNA was analyzed by PCR using bacterial genus-specific 16S rRNA primers. Colitis was assessed by disease activity index (DAI) score, histological scoring, and western blot for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The day 4 DAI for the DSS + triclosan (DSS+T) group was higher than the DSS treated mice, but there was no difference at day 5 or 6. Triclosan did not alter induction of COX-2 expression by DSS. Total fecal lactobacilli were greater in the control and triclosan versus DSS and DSS+T groups. Coliforms were increased by DSS and increased the most in DSS+T group. We conclude that low-dose exposure to triclosan may increase susceptibility to DSS colitis may influence the composition of the intestinal microbiota.
Faculty Sponsor: KRISTEN L.W. WALTON

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE MATH AND PHYSICS

Analytical Papers and Analyses

Castanada, Elena. FRACTALS AND THEIR CONSTRUCTIONS.
The concept of self-similarity was first considered back in the 17th century, since then fractals have come into formalization. Fractals are recursive and appear similar at all levels of magnification. Fractals can be constructed through reiterations of a similar shape. In the poster, the construction of self-similar fractals will be explored.
Faculty Sponsor: GAVIN WATERS
McKay, Ryan. TESSELLATIONS IN HYPERBOLIC SPACE.
A tessellation or tiling of the Euclidean plane is a covering of the plane using the same shape(s). We shall talk about Geometric Tessellations. Giving an example of a tessellation in Euclidean space and showing that the same tessellation works in Hyperbolic space. This will be an examination of the shapes geometric properties.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. GAVIN WATERS
Quaney, Adelaide. THE "MANY FACES" OF GEOMETRY: PLATONIC SOLIDS IN EUCLIDEAN SPACE.
From its beginnings in Greece, mathematics has been affected by many great philosophers such as Aristotle, Socrates, and Euclid. However, the theory of geometric solids was greatly influenced by Plato. Platonic solids are comprised of regular geometric shapes fit into a 3-D solid. In each corner of such a solid the same number of surfaces collide. Only five Platonic solids exist: tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, dodecahedron and icosahedron. This project aims to address the history of Plato and geometry, as well as the constructions and proofs regarding the existence of Platonic solids and their use in modern mathematics.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. GAVIN WATERS
Schnoor, Ashley. THEOREMS OF EUCLIDEAN AND HYPERBOLIC GEOMETRIES.
Euclid was a Greek mathematician who developed an axiomatic mathematical system, which included five axioms. Euclidean geometry is the geometry taught in high schools. Different geometries came from changing Euclid’s fifth axiom, also known as the parallel postulate. One of these new geometries is hyperbolic geometry. Poincare developed a model for this hyperbolic geometry that is based on a unit circle. We will look at the following questions: do Euclidean theorems hold in hyperbolic geometry? Are there some theorems that only hold in Euclidean? Are there some changes to the Euclidean theorems that only work in hyperbolic? This project examines these theorems and determines the answers to these questions.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. GAVIN WATERS
Smith, Allison. THE CLOCK STRIKES 3-D.
Modern computer animation is based on vector analysis, in particular, how matrices can be used to project a 3-Dimensional object onto a 2-Dimensional plane. Also, matrices can be used to make the object appear to move and rotate in space. This project explains these concepts, and gives an example.
Faculty Sponsor: GAVIN WATERS

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Empirical Projects

Brock, Jeffrey. STUDENT PERCEPTIONS OF SEX OFFENSES.
Criminal justice students were the focus of the study because they are our future professionals who will be enforcing the laws. The study want to find if the future professionals of the criminal justice system differed in opinions than the public. A survey was distributed to see how students define sex offenders and differentiate who should be on registry. It was expected that criminal justice students would define a sex offender in line with established laws and follow the law when asked questions about who should have to register. Whereas, it was expected that other students would use more of their personal ethics and morals when defining and determining who should be on the registry. Lastly, it was expected that underclassmen of all majors would follow their personal feelings and beliefs more than the upperclassmen of all majors surveyed. Once the data was collected it was entered into SPSS and tested for statistically significant differences. The findings showed that there was no significant difference between criminal justice majors and other majors in how they defined sex offenders and who should have to register. The findings also showed that there was no significant difference in the responses of the underclassmen and upperclassmen. The criminal justice students see along the same lines as the public. The future professionals in the criminal justice field may empathize for the public involved in the sex offender registry because of their similar beliefs.
Faculty Sponsor: GREG LINDSTEADT, PH.D.

Internship/Practicum Experience

Clement, Katelynn. MICROSCOPY OF CLOTHING FIBERS TO DETERMINE A DEATH INTERVAL.
Our study examined the deterioration of clothing fibers on pig carcasses. The fibers were tested to determine if after active decomposition a death interval could be estimated. Photographs were taken daily of the decomposition process which lasted approximately 20 days. The testing period was for four months. The weather and soil samples were also retrieved during this time. After the samples were collected they were examined for morphological changes and changes in the refractive indexes. The refractive indexes showed no change. However there were differences in the bacteria development, “tunneling,” on the cotton jean samples between the different time periods.
Faculty Sponsor: GREG LINDSTEADT

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING

Empirical Projects

Gatewood, Ronni; Jensen, Jillian; McDaniel, Jessica. PREVALENCE OF ADVANCE DIRECTIVES.
The idea of this study is to investigate the number of people who have advance directives in place and the information included in those documents. By investigating this, it can help nurses facilitate discussions regarding advance planning. It may also initiate a program to teach people the importance of advance planning and describe different options of end-of-life decisions. In this study a literature review and an anonymous survey were conducted. Our results were similar to information found in previous studies. We found that out of 176 participants, only 14.2% had advance directives. 68% of individuals who had advance directives fell into the age category of 41-69 years old. 114 participants were age 20-25, only 2 people in this category had advance directives.
Faculty Sponsor: CORDER, STEPHANIE

Literature Reviews

Carpentieri, Nicole, Grove, Traci, Young, Heidi. THE EFFECTS OF PCB EXPOSURE DURING PREGNANCY.
The goal of this project was to look at the effects of PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) had on pregnant women. PCBs are organic compounds that have been banned since the 1970s due to the effect they had on human health. Although they have been banned, they have a long half-life so they are still causing health problems particularly to pregnant women and the fetus. Several studies we looked at analyzed blood from the umbilical cord which reflected the amount of exposure the fetus had and then followed the infant through several years of life to note any developmental delays or health problems caused by the PCBs. A few other studies looked at the effects of half-lives, metabolism, breastfeeding, and the mother'slifestyle. Through our study we were able to see the negative effects PCB exposure can have on pregant women and their children.
Faculty Sponsor: STEPHANIE CORDER
Chandler, Kyndl; Montgomery, Haley; Wilson, Mariah. WOMEN IN LABOR: EAT, DRINK, AND HAVE BABIES.
Whether or not women should be allowed to consume food and drinks during labor has caused some conflict among healthcare providers and researchers over the years. Since the 1940s women have been discouraged from consuming oral intake while they are in labor. They are discouraged based on possible complications that may result from aspiration during general anesthesia. Researchers have done studies to look at the possible pros and cons of not consuming oral intake and have identified several areas of interest, which include: intravenous fluid replacement therapy, allowing the woman to choose, delayed gastric emptying, and changes in the woman’s body during pregnancy. Most of the researcher has concluded that more evidence needs to be done to provide more support for allowing women to have some type of nutritional support during pregnancy. The support of evidence-based research will allow for changes in practice guidelines and in the health-care setting.
Faculty Sponsor: ALICIA SINDT
Preston, Lacy; McCreath, Katie; Davis, Michelle; Yeh, Pi-Ming . CARING FOR CHILDREN WITH AUTISTIC DISORDER.
The purpose of this study was to systematically synthesize the literature on the efficacy of gluten-free, casein-free diet and applied behavior analysis on the behaviors of children with autism spectrum disorders. Study Question: What is the effect of a gluten-free casein free diet and applied behavior analysis on children with autistic spectrum disorders? Methods: The sample was identified by computerized literature searches and manual searches of references. Electronic database, CINAHL, was searched for relevant studies from 2002-2008. Results: Eighteen journal articles were analyzed. These interventional studies have shown positive effects on improving the symptoms of children with autism spectrum disorders.
Faculty Sponsor: PI-MING YEH
Greub, Jessica; Oom, Brandi; Huwe, Emily. CO-SLEEPING AND SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME: A LITERATURE REVIEW.
There are many known risk factors that contribute to SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome). Our aim is to determine whether or not there is sound evidence to support co- sleeping between infant and parents, with an increased risk of dying from SIDS. The ACE Star Model was used to guide our research. Our data was obtained from research articles that had done studies to determine if there is indeed a connection between co-sleeping and SIDS. Our research found that co-sleeping if combined with other unsafe factors, can contribute to SIDS. Information obtained was then compared with current guidelines on co-sleeping to determine if they were compatible. The research obtained will be given to Obstetric nurses in order to educate them on current information related to safe sleep environments for infants. Nurses can then use this information to educate new parents on safe sleep environment. However, further research needs to be done to determine if co-sleeping in itself is truly a risk factor.
Faculty Sponsor: CRYSTAL HARRIS
Hester, Rebecca, Colvin, Mary, & Solis, Jorge. LYME DISEASE, EARLY DIAGNOSIS, WHERE ARE THE FACTS?.
Abstract In an attempt to determine the reason why Lyme disease is so often under diagnosed or misdiagnosed, this literature review was conducted using Med-line, and CINAHL databases to research journal articles regarding Lyme disease and evidence-based practice guidelines developed in regards to Lyme disease. Following the literature review, the ACE-Star Model was utilized to organize information discovered. After organizing the information discovered into the categories outlined in the ACE-Star Model, we made our suggestions for recommended changes in practice that would facilitate more adequate diagnosis and public awareness of Lyme disease symptoms, diagnosis, and prevention to improve quality of care and to reduce the number of misdiagnosed cases of Lyme disease.
Faculty Sponsor: DEB ELLIS, M.S.N., N.P.-C.
Pruitt, Teddi; Cadena, Marlys; Gordon, Kelly; Shepherd, Claire. QUALITY CARE FOR THE DYING PATIENT.
This literature review focuses on alternative comfort measures-outside of opioid pain management-for the palliative care patient. The purpose of this study is to examine the need for the use of alternative comfort measures in the care of dying patients. The research team’s intent is to establish, through evidence based research, the need for a more holistic approach to improve the quality of life of dying patients. Research will include the inherent obligation that nurses have to patients in guaranteeing them a more dignified death.
Faculty Sponsor: CORDER, STEPHANIE

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

Empirical Projects

Armilio, Michelle, Barger, Megan. ALFRED ADLER & THE INFERIORITY COMPLEX.
Alfred Adler is traditionally considered to be known as one of the three great fathers of modern psychotherapy. He is especially influential to teachers and doctors all around the world. Alfred believed the sense of inferiority was the motivating force in the lives of humans. Adler was specifically interested in relationships between siblings, parents relationships, and birth orders.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Belcher, Joseph; Keuhn, Yuri; Powell, Amanda; Solomon, Sara; Sterzinger, Jamie. IDK HOW TO FEEL ABOUT THIS TXT MSG: ABSENCE OF EMOTION WHEN PROCESSING ACRONYMS.
Text messaging has increased substantially and with it the use of acronyms. Even so, little is known about the way acronyms and their emotional contents are processed. We used a variant of the Stroop task in which participants named the colors of words and acronyms that had either emotional or neutral content. Response times and error rates were higher for emotional words than for neutral words, but no differences were found between emotional and neutral acronyms. These data suggest that the emotions attached to words are not conveyed through acronyms even though the literal meanings of the acronyms are known.
Faculty Sponsor: MARY STILL
Bryant, Holly. ALBERT BANDURA: HIS THEORY.
Albert Bandura has written many things. Most of his writing is about Social Learning Theory, and modeling.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Bryant, Holly. ALBERT BANDURA: A HISTORICAL LOOK.
This poster is a historical look at Albert Bandura and how his theories could be linked back to the ideas of Charles Darwin
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN
Cox, Tara. Hazley, Ashanti. Knox, Deanna. Spitzer, Brett.. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, SOCIALIOZATION AND FAMILY COHESION WITH PREADOLESCENTS.
Middle School children (n=102) from two schools were examined with the purpose of finding how emotional intelligence relates to the age, sociability and family cohesion of the child. Further analysis showed that emotional intelligence was clearly linked with sociability and family cohesion.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. TEDDI DEKA
Kelder, Kayla. EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE, FAITH AND FAMILY IN THE ADOLESCENT YEARS.
Strict focus on academics and standardized testing may leave children lacking in ‘emotional intelligence’ (interpersonal and intrapersonal skills) that some believe are even more important to future achievement. In this examination of 600 parochial school adolescents, family cohesion, religiousness and identity significantly predicted trait emotional intelligence.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. TEDDI DEKA
Knox, Deanna I.. DARWIN, DEWEY AND SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY.
Abstract\\r\\nThis is a historical perspective on the influence of Darwin’s Theory of Evolution on the ideas and writings of John Dewey. John Dewey had a strong belief in the necessity of education, flexibility, and an ethical outlook on the individuals within our society that may not appear as ‘fit’ as the rest. His theories said our evolution is part of the environment that we create and that coexistence is necessary for continued evolution. These theories were a large part of Dewey’s concepts about educating our children in our society such that they would be equipped to strengthen our future society.\\r\\n
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN
Chris Lanman, Kerri Rollins, Brooke Palmer, Logan Parker, Allison Raymond. DEPENDENT VARIABLES AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INTERVENTION EVALUATION.
We evaluated the effect of domestic violence prevention training given by the Saint Joseph YWCA and District Attorney. The training and control groups completed pre-and post-test questionnaires. Benevolent sexism is predicted to be a more sensitive measure of the training’s effectiveness than hostile sexism. The present research highlights the importance of developing training to sensitize college students to subtle forms of domestic violence, and doing evaluations with that subtlety in mind. Had the evaluation only assessed hostile sexism, the training might appear ineffective; including a more understated measure of benevolent sexism provided a more sensitive measure of the training’s effectiveness.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. KELLY HENRY
Shinn, Coleman R.. DARWIN\'S EVOLUTIONARY THEORY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY.
Darwin’s theories and influences have been as wide \r\nranging and diverse as the number of new branches of \r\nnew subjects they’ve spawned. Darwin’s theories, \r\ntook the basic studies in ethology, and broadened \r\nthe scope to incorporate evolutionary changes in \r\nbehavior. The resulting discipline, sociobiology, \r\nthen took Darwin’s theories and attempted to apply \r\nthem to humans as well as animals, resulting in the \r\ndiscipline of Evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary \r\npsychology can be viewed as a direct result of \r\nDarwinian Theory as it evolved and adapted to the \r\never changing zeitgeist of the realm of psychology.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN

Historical Papers

Bryan, Whitney . EVOLUTIONARY THEORY’S INFLUENCE ON THE STUDY OF EMOTION IN PSYCHOLOGY.
From structural to evolutionary psychology, scientific inquiry on emotion has developed with each successive school in psychology. James’ Principles was influenced by Darwinian theory inspired the advancements made in psychology by functionalists during the turn of the nineteenth century. The importance of mental functions and individual difference for the survival of the species widened the scope of psychological inquiry, making it possible to study emotion. The equation of humans with animals is a principle in evolutionary theory examined by James, paving the way for comparative and behavioral psychology. Darwinian theory continues to inspire psychology today.
Faculty Sponsor: PHILLIP WANN
Hazley, Ashanti. JOHN DEWEY AND THE PROGRESSIVE EDUCATION MODEL: THEORY AND DARWINIAN INFLUENCE.
Charles Darwin and his theory of evolution had a great influence on the study of psychology. His theory had an impact on many part of psychology from individual differences and developmental psychology. One of the major influences he had on psychology was on the educational psychologist John Dewey and his progressive education movement. Dewey, the leader of the progressive education movement, adopted many of the principles from Darwin’s theory and applied them to education. This paper outlines his philosophy of education, his principles of the progressive education movement and how it relates to evolutionary theory.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN
Peters, Jillian. FRANCIS GALTON: HIS PROFESSIONAL WORKS AS INFLUENCED BY CHARLES DARWIN.
This poster outlines the professional works of Francis Galton. Galton was the half cousin to Charles Darwin who played a large role in Galton’s abandonment of religious beliefs. Galton abandoned these beliefs so he could explore theories of natural selection and inheritance, which is what he did in his book Hereditary Genius. In his book, Galton discussed his theory of how natural ability is derived through inheritance and the classification of men according to their natural ability. Galton also developed the theory of eugenics. While studying eugenics Galton inadvertently disproved his own theory, leading him to the theory of regression.
Faculty Sponsor: PHILLIP WANN
Phillips, Kaylee. THE EFFECTS OF DARWIN'S THEORY ON WILLIAM JAMES.
The purpose of this paper is to review the effect Darwin’s theory had on William James’ ideas. Indirectly through criticizing the works of Spencer, James applied Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Evolution, adaptations, and variations can be seen in James’ ideas on the mind, psychology, pragmatism, habits and instincts. Habits do not pass from one generation to the next, while instincts do.
Faculty Sponsor: PHILLIP WANN
Raymond, Allison. DARWIN'S INFLUENCE ON STANLEY HALL.
The purpose of this research is to examine the influence Charles Darwin had on the history of psychology. More importantly that impact he had on Stanley Hall’s contributions to psychology. Hall is most known for his first in the world of psychology, like being the first to launch a psychology journal in America. The most important contribution of Hall was the nationwide child study movement that he lead in American. This movement was influence by Darwin’s theory of recapitulation and evolution. Hall was criticized for this theory of recapitulation, but none the less Hall brought child study into the psychology field.  
Faculty Sponsor: PHILIP WANN
Rollins, Kerri . DARWIN'S INFLUENCES:SOCIAL DARWINISM.
This paper focuses on Darwin’s contributions, specifically in the field of Psychology. This paper will take in depth look at Herbert Spencer’s theory of Social Darwinism and it’s implications in society past and present.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. PHILLIP WANN
Shaiffer, Crystal. THE ERA OF JOHN WATSON.
This paper will show how the age of behaviorism became popular by John B. Watson. To understand the coming of the era I will briefly touch on the influence of Ivan Pavlov with his work on the digestive system of dogs. Edward Thorndike introduction of the puzzle box and Charles Darwin theory of Natural Selection in relation to psychology. Taking this intellect we will see how Watson develops and defines his quest for behaviorism in the psychology field. In the end we will have a better understanding of why behaviorism had flourished under Watson’s watch.
Faculty Sponsor: WANN
Shinn, Coleman R.. DARWIN'S EVOLUTIONARY THEORY AND ITS INFLUENCE ON EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY.
Darwin's theories and influences have been as wide ranging and diverse as the number of branches of new subjects they've spawned. Darwin's theories, took the basic studies in Ethology, and broadened the scope to incorporate evolutionary changes in behavior and physiology. The resulting discipline, Sociobiology, then took Darwin's theories and attempted to apply them to humans as well as animals resulting in the discipline of Evolutionary Psychology. Evolutionary Psychology can be viewed as a direct result of Darwinian theory as it evolved and adapted to the ever changing zeitgeist of psychology
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN
Warnke, Tessa. G. STANLEY HALL'S WORK AND THE INFLUENCE OF CHARLES DARWIN.
Stanley Hall is an influential figure in the history of psychology. Although he is known for many different accomplishments, he is best known for his work and theories in child development, which earned him the title of the “Father of Adolescence.” Hall’s work ultimately gained its roots from Charles Darwin’s theory of the origin of species. This poster looks into the brief history of Hall’s life, his work, and how he has been influenced by Charles Darwin.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN

Literature Reviews

Parker, Logan. SEXUAL SELECTION: DARWIN'S THEORY FOR MATE CHOICE.
Charles Darwin, in order to explain the differences between males and females, created the theory of sexual selection. He argues that male combat and female choice among our ancestors would have contributed for male’s larger size, pugnacity, strength, and intelligence as well as female beauty. There is research that agrees and disagrees with his idea. Nonetheless, Darwin should be credited with trying to explain this phenomenon but also, with his other ideas, and his science that went against the norm of society thus creating new fields of studies that would not be present today.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. WANN

Personality Papers

Blaylock, Clarisha. ROLLO MAY AN EXISTENTIALIST.
Abstract This Poster is about Rollo May. It contains a brief biography of his life, and accomplishments. It also mentions and gives a concise summery of a couple of his most influential books. This Poster also holds information about Existential Psychology. May believed that we as human beings are responsible for who we become. Today Rollo May is often referred to as the father of Existential Psychology because of his contributions and theories.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Blodgett, Christopher. HARRY STACK SULLIVAN, A DISTINCT THERAPIST.
Harry Stack Sullivan developed some of the first theories on how our social and interpersonal experiences effect our personality. This poster displays facts about his theories and his life as one of the largest contributors to Therapy as we know it today.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. JAMES S. BARGAR
Bolten, Jamie. JEAN PIAGET AND THE DEVELOPING CHILD.
This poster focuses on Jean Piaget\'s theories and ideas on the developing personality and his impact on modern theories.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGER
Brooke, Melissa. GEORGE KELLY AND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL CONSTRUCTS.
My poster is about George Kelly and his theory of Personal Constructs. I have listed a biography of Kelly, followed by his view of constructive alternativism. Beneath that I included the assessment and research of Kelly's theory involving his view of the therapist and client relationship.I have stated Kelly's basic theory of Personal Constructs, stating his fundamental postulate and the eleven corollaries supporting it. Beneath the basic theory I have stated the implications/applications of Kelly's theory including his development of the REP TEST. Finally, I have stated all the references I used in conducting this research of George Kelly.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
James Bush, Latashia Alfred. COGNITIVE THEORIST.
This poster is presenting two psychologist Aaron Beck and Albert Ellis that specialize in cognitive research and thearpy
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGER
Donaldson, Tricia. GORDON ALLPORT AND THE UNIQUENESS OF THE INDIVIDUAL .
Gordon Allport had a major role in shaping the field of personality psychology. In my poster I will discuss the influences that his work has had in both the past and present. I will also discuss Gordon Allport's theory and his exploration of the concept of traits.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Edwards, Kathi. MASLOW'S HUMANISTIC THEORY.
This is a poster which will represent Abraham Maslow. He is known as the Father of Humanistic Psychology. His views emphasized human growth and potential and focused on the positive.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR/DR. CRONK
Holbrook, Lisa. RAYMOND B. CATTELL - FACTOR ANALYTIC TRAIT THEORY.
Raymond B. Cattell's career lasted more than 70 years. His Factor Analytic Trait Theory was developed with a scientific approach which in turn earned him the respect of fellow psychologists decade after decade. He authored more than 50 books and 500 journal articles. Raymond Cattell's unique approach to the field of psychology helped pave the way for the argument that psychology is indeed a science.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
King, Jennifer. JULIAN B ROTTER AND THE SOCIAL LEARNING THEORY.
Julian B Rotter is considered one of the 100 most eminent psychologists of the 20th century. This poster presentation overviews his Social Learning Theory and highlights his many contributions and breadth influence.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. JAMES S. BARGAR
Knox, Deanna I.. PRINCIPLES OF ZEN BUDHISM RELATED TO PERSONALITY.
The Principles of Zen Budhism are examined in relation to personality. The concepts of the philosophy of Zen as well as the theory of unconscious. Strong aspects of practical application as well as specific examples of therapies in use currently are included. An ancient theory shown with real time application.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Longworth, Danielle. PSYCHOANALYTIC SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY: ERICH FROMM'S TRANSCENDENCE FROM NATURE.
This is a brief discussion of Erich Fromm and his idea of the basic nature of humans, human escape mechanisms and human characteristics. There is also a brief section on the impact of Fromm's work.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Morgan, Rebecca. RADICAL BEHAVIORISM: B. F. SKINNER'S PERSONALITY THEORY.
This poster details the theory and status, both historical and current, of B. F. Skinner's theory of personality.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGER
Rollins, Kerri . HOW DOES THAT MAKE YOU FEEL? CARL ROGERS AND CLIENT CENTERED THERAPY.
This paper focuses on Carl Roger’s humanistic \r\n\\r\\napproach to therapy, his theory of personality \r\nand \\r\\nclient centered therapy and his \r\ncontributions to the \\r\\nfield of psychology.
Faculty Sponsor: DR JAMES BARGAR
Warnke, Tessa. HANS EYSENCK AND BIOLOGICAL TRAITS.
This poster’s main focus is on the psychologist Hans Eysenck. It will cover the basics of his trait theory and the model of personality.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. BARGAR
Washington, Deraan. INFLUENCES OF SIGMUND FREUD.
Summary of Sigmund Freud\\\'s life. Information on Freuds accomplishements as well as personality theory.Information on Freud\\\'s basic components in regards to his theory and his explanation of basic nature of humans.
Faculty Sponsor:
Wharton, Jacob. FRITZ PERLS & GESTALT DREAM ANALYSIS.
Fritz Perls and the Gestalt approach to dreams views each part of the dream as a projection of the individual and has existential meaning. By bringing the dream to life, only then can one gain personal meaning of the dream and take responsibility for it. The Gestalt approach does not interpret dreams as such in the traditional sense, but rather brings the dream to life and individuals relive the dream as if it is happening now, spoken or acted out in the present. The dreamer’s dream represents a projection of oneself and are expressions of the dreamers contradictions and inconsistencies, by acting out the opposing sides the dreamer can then come to accept and integrate their opposing forces.
Faculty Sponsor: DR. JAMES BARGAR

URSI Project

Bryan, Whitney. MORALITY, POLITICAL ORIENTATION, AND EMOTION: HOW FEAR AFFECTS MORAL DECISION MAKING.
The purpose of this study is to examine whether negative emotional states affect conservatives and liberals differently when making moral decisions. Participants were randomly assigned to three groups and shown emotion-inducing videos to create either fear, disgust, or neutral state. Analysis showed that the fear state significantly affected conservative moral judgment, resulting in less utilitarian decisions.
Faculty Sponsor: PHILLIP WANN
71 submissions listed.
BIOLOGY21
COMPUTER SCIENCE MATH AND PHYSICS5
CRIMINAL JUSTICE2
NURSING7
PSYCHOLOGY36
ANALYTICAL PAPER/ANALYSIS6
EMPIRICAL28
HISTORICAL PAPER11
INTERNSHIP1
LITERATURE REVIEW7
PERSONALITY PAPER16
URSI PROJECT2